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The French Lieutenant's Woman

The book The French Lieutenant's Woman was made into the movie The French Lieutenant's Woman.

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Book details for The French Lieutenant's Woman

The French Lieutenant's Woman was written by John Fowles. The book was published in 1969 by Vintage. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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Movie details for The French Lieutenant's Woman

The movie was released in 1981 and directed by Karel Reisz. The French Lieutenant's Woman was produced by MGM (Video & DVD). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Meryl Streep, Jeremy Irons, Hilton McRae, Emily Morgan, Charlotte Mitchell, Lynsey Baxter, Jean Faulds, Peter Vaughan, Colin Jeavons, Liz Smith, Patience Collier, John Barrett (III), Leo McKern, Arabella Weir, Ben Forster, Catherine Willmer, Anthony Langdon, Edward Duke, Richard Griffiths and Graham Fletcher-Cook.

 

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Writer Harold Pinter (Betrayal) and director Karel Reisz (Isadora) take an experimental spin with John Fowles's magnificent novel set in Victorian England, and come up with something puzzling. Jeremy Irons and Meryl Streep play the forbidden lovers in Fow... Read More
Writer Harold Pinter (Betrayal) and director Karel Reisz (Isadora) take an experimental spin with John Fowles's magnificent novel set in Victorian England, and come up with something puzzling. Jeremy Irons and Meryl Streep play the forbidden lovers in Fowles's story, but in a parallel story line they also play contemporary actors performing those characters in a movie production and having an affair of their own during off-hours. Got that? Considering that Fowles himself presents alternative endings in his novel, something equally eccentric is called for here. But little is accomplished by this intertwining of a fictional past and present, and the opportunity to do justice to a great story is lost. On the plus side, Irons and Streep are instantly striking as a natural couple on screen, and their presence makes watching this film easy enough despite the larger problems. --Tom Keogh