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Wolfen

The book Wolfen was made into the movie Wolfen.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 4 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Wolfen

Wolfen was written by Whitley Strieber. The book was published in 1978 by Avon. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Whitley Strieber also wrote The Hunger (1981) and Communion: A True Story (1987).

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Movie details for Wolfen

The movie was released in 1981. Wolfen was produced by Warner Home Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Albert Finney, Diane Venora, Ralph Bell, Dehl Berti, Max M. Brown, Sarah Felder, Peter Michael Goetz, Sam Gray, Gregory Hines, Chris Manor, John McCurry, Tom Noonan, Dick O'Neill, Edward James Olmos, Anne Marie Pohtamo, Donald Symington, James Tolkan, Reginald VelJohnson and Jeffery Ware.

 

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Wolfen is definitely the oddest and most socially conscious of the three big werewolf movies released in 1981 (the others were The Howling and An American Werewolf in London). Rumpled detective Albert Finney is investigating some brutal NYC murders, which... Read More
Wolfen is definitely the oddest and most socially conscious of the three big werewolf movies released in 1981 (the others were The Howling and An American Werewolf in London). Rumpled detective Albert Finney is investigating some brutal NYC murders, which leads him to discover that the collapsing buildings of the South Bronx are home to a pack of very vindictive wolflike creatures. American Indian mythology and environmental issues are more to the point here than silver-bullet lycanthropy. As a police procedural, the movie's a bust, its rhythms wrong and Finney's tortured Brooklyn accent unconvincing. But as a horror-mood piece, it can get under your skin. Some trippy photography, plus a bunch of interesting actors at the beginnings of their film careers (Diane Venora, Gregory Hines, and a lean and hungry Edward James Olmos), outweigh the druggy pace and period hairstyles. Director Michael Wadleigh (Woodstock) never made another feature. --Robert Horton