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Lords of Discipline

The book Lords of Discipline was made into the movie Lords of Discipline.

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Book details for Lords of Discipline

Lords of Discipline was written by Pat Conroy. The book was published in 1980 by Dial Press Trade Paperback. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Pat Conroy also wrote Prince of Tides (1987).

 

Read More About This Book

In this powerful, mesmerizing, and highly acclaimed bestseller, Pat Conroy sweeps us into the turbulent world of four young men–friends, cadets, and blood brothers–and their days of hazing, heartbreak, pride, betrayal, and, ultimately, humanit... Read More
In this powerful, mesmerizing, and highly acclaimed bestseller, Pat Conroy sweeps us into the turbulent world of four young men–friends, cadets, and blood brothers–and their days of hazing, heartbreak, pride, betrayal, and, ultimately, humanity.

We go deeply into the heart of the novel’s hero, Will McLean, a rebellious outsider with his own personal code of honor, who is battling into manhood the hard way. Immersed in a poignant love affair with a haunting beauty, Will must boldly confront the terrifying injustice of a corrupt institution as he struggles to expose a mysterious group known as “The Ten.”

Movie details for Lords of Discipline

The movie was released in 1983 and directed by Franc Roddam. Lords of Discipline was produced by Paramount. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include David Keith, Robert Prosky, G.D. Spradlin, Barbara Babcock, Michael Biehn, Rick Rossovich, John Lavachielli, Mitchell Lichtenstein, Mark Breland, Malcolm Danare, Judge Reinhold, Greg Webb, Bill Paxton, Dean R. Miller, Ed Bishop, Stuart Milligan, Katharine Levy, Jason Connery, Rolf Saxon and Michael Horton.

 

Read More About This Movie

Many who have vivid memories of this 1982 dramatic thriller about racism, hazing, and heroism at a hallowed Southern military academy will delight in its DVD release. The Lords of Discipline was based on Pat Conroy's semi-autobiographical novel about his ... Read More
Many who have vivid memories of this 1982 dramatic thriller about racism, hazing, and heroism at a hallowed Southern military academy will delight in its DVD release. The Lords of Discipline was based on Pat Conroy's semi-autobiographical novel about his days attending the famous Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. The film is set at the fictionalized Carolina Military Institute (and shot on locations in England) in 1964 where freshmen are customarily put through hazing rituals that may have been routine at the time, but seem positively brutal today. During Will McClean's (David Keith) senior year, a black cadet is being admitted for the first time. Will's military faculty mentor (an already grizzled Robert Prosky) charges him with making sure things don't get too out of hand with this new situation and the inevitable initiation rituals. The black cadet certainly has his horrifying tribulations, but there's also a geeky white plebe who may be in bigger trouble. During Will's awakening to the deeper, darker goings on, he discovers a secret society under the hand of the commandant (the great G.D. Spradlin) that carries out more than just hazing rituals when it deems necessary. The suspense, sense of time and place, and array of superb performances are all ample reasons to recommend The Lords of Discipline as a classic keeper or a casual view. David Keith gives a strong performance as the conflicted upper-class cadet. His strong jaw and gentle drawl was coming off a strong supporting role in An Officer and a Gentleman and he went on to several more interesting starring roles before petering out as a leading man. In fact, the cast is pretty great all around, including solid, young-buck turns by Michael Biehn (The Terminator, Aliens) and a familiar face credited as "Wild Bill" Paxton who went on to be not so wild in One False Move, Twister, Titanic, and many others. --Ted Fry