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The Osterman Weekend

The book The Osterman Weekend was made into the movie The Osterman Weekend.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 3 votes for the book, and 1 vote for the movie.

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Book details for The Osterman Weekend

The Osterman Weekend was written by Robert Ludlum. The book was published in 1972 by Bantam. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Robert Ludlum also wrote The Holcroft Covenant (1978), The Bourne Identity (1980) and The Bourne Supremacy (1986).

 

Read More About This Book

In Zurich. . .in Moscow. . .in Washington. The  machinery was already set in motion, while in a  quiet suburb an odd assortment of men and women  gathered for a momentous weekend. At stake was the  very existence of the United States of America. .  .and t... Read More
In Zurich. . .in Moscow. . .in Washington. The  machinery was already set in motion, while in a  quiet suburb an odd assortment of men and women  gathered for a momentous weekend. At stake was the  very existence of the United States of America. .  .and the future of the entire free  world.

Movie details for The Osterman Weekend

The movie was released in 1983 and directed by Sam Peckinpah. The Osterman Weekend was produced by Anchor Bay. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Rutger Hauer, John Hurt, Craig T. Nelson, Dennis Hopper, Chris Sarandon, Meg Foster, Helen Shaver, Cassie Yates, Sandy McPeak, Christopher Starr, Burt Lancaster, Cheryl Carter, John Bryson, Anne Haney, Kristen Peckinpah, Marshall Ho'o, Jan Triska, Hansford Rowe, Merete Van Kamp and Bruce A. Block.

 

Read More About This Movie

Sam Peckinpah's final film has a lot to recommend it, including a complicated story derived from a Robert Ludlum novel but laced with Peckinpah's hard questions about loyalty and the balance between civilization and basic instincts. Rutger Hauer stars as ... Read More
Sam Peckinpah's final film has a lot to recommend it, including a complicated story derived from a Robert Ludlum novel but laced with Peckinpah's hard questions about loyalty and the balance between civilization and basic instincts. Rutger Hauer stars as John Tanner, a television host with strong criticisms of America's cold-war conduct. Looking forward to a weekend of socializing with old friends (played by Craig T. Nelson, Dennis Hopper, and Chris Sarandon), Tanner is approached by a CIA agent (John Hurt) who tells him his friends may be Soviet agents. Tanner agrees to let the spy agency set up surveillance in his house; it turns out there is more to the agent's claims than meets the eye and Tanner's weekend eventually erupts into violence. Osterman is not Peckinpah at his best (though, typically, the director was under siege from production politics), but the maestro of montage certainly worked in some extraordinary action sequences. --Tom Keogh