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Seize the Day

The book Seize the Day was made into the movie Seize the Day.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 4 votes for the book, and 4 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Seize the Day

Seize the Day was written by Saul Bellow. The book was published in 1984 by Viking Adult. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Seize the Day

The movie was released in 1986 and directed by Fielder Cook. Seize the Day was produced by Monterey Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Robin Williams, Richard B. Shull, David Bickford, Glenne Headly, Stephen Strimpell, Joseph Wiseman, Jayne Heller, Katherine Borowitz, John Fiedler, William Duell, Jerry Stiller, James Cahill, Louis Guss, Gillien Goll, Mara Lori, Fran Brill, Steve Vinovich, Tony Roberts, Saul Bellow and Adam Rappaport.

 

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This 1986 film--a dead-serious performance by Robin Williams, minus the overlay of schmaltz that informed his acting in the late 1990s--sat on the shelf and had no theatrical release, for obvious reasons: the film has the downbeat spiral of a 1970s film, ... Read More
This 1986 film--a dead-serious performance by Robin Williams, minus the overlay of schmaltz that informed his acting in the late 1990s--sat on the shelf and had no theatrical release, for obvious reasons: the film has the downbeat spiral of a 1970s film, relentless in its depiction of human frailty at the breaking point. That doesn't mean it's a bad film; to the contrary, it's actually quite a good film. But it is in no way audience-friendly in its vision of a human being who has reached the end of his tether. Directed by Fielder Cook, it's based on a Saul Bellow novel and strikes exactly the right note, a combination of absurdity and dread. Williams has the desperate energy of a man approaching 40 with nothing to show for his life--and a disapproving, disappointed father he's constantly trying to impress. Jerry Stiller is great as Williams's seeming friend, who hooks him into a business deal guaranteed to change his life and his luck. --Marshall Fine