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The Witches of Eastwick

The book The Witches of Eastwick was made into the movie The Witches of Eastwick.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 2 votes for the book, and 3 votes for the movie.

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Book details for The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick was written by John Updike. The book was published in 1984 by Knopf. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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Many of us have known witches...but none like Jane, Sukie and Alexandra, a real coven. Artists, they sculpt, write and play...but that is all for the surface. Their beings are submerged...and malignant. Most men quail, but not Darryl Van Horne. A wealth... Read More
Many of us have known witches...but none like Jane, Sukie and Alexandra, a real coven.

Artists, they sculpt, write and play...but that is all for the surface. Their beings are submerged...and malignant.

Most men quail, but not Darryl Van Horne. A wealthy stranger who arrives in town, he goes them one better...he sets up as an alchemist.

In John Updike's hands this material takes on a life of its own. Updike examines how women cope when they are alone...and how deprivation turns them into what they were afraid of becoming.

Movie details for The Witches of Eastwick

The movie was released in 1987 and directed by George Miller (II). The Witches of Eastwick was produced by Warner Home Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Jack Nicholson, Cher, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer, Veronica Cartwright, Richard Jenkins, Keith Jochim, Carel Struycken, Helen Lloyd Breed, Caroline Struzik, Michele Sincavage, Nicol Sincavage, Heather Coleman, Carolyn Ditmars, Cynthia Ditmars, Christine Ditmars, Craig Burket, Abraham Mishkind, Christopher Verrette and Becca Lish.

 

Read More About This Movie

Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, and in George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's novel he plays it for all he's worth. As a wolfish womanizer summoned by three bored women in a picturesque New England town, he's sating all of his appetites wi... Read More
Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, and in George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's novel he plays it for all he's worth. As a wolfish womanizer summoned by three bored women in a picturesque New England town, he's sating all of his appetites with a rakish grin. Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer play the women who discover their untapped magical powers by accident. The smart and sexy singles, out of place in the conservatism of their village, find happiness, however briefly, in the arms and bed of the libidinous devil, but he's got his own ulterior motives. Miller revels in the sensual display of sex, food, and magic, whipping up a storm of effects that finally get out of hand in an overblown ending. It's a handsome film with strong performances all around, but the mix of anarchic comedy and supernatural horror doesn't always gel and Miller seems to lose the plot in his zeal for cinematic excitement. The performances ultimately keep the film aloft: the hedonistic joy that Nicholson celebrates with every leering gaze and boorish vulgarity is almost enough to make bad form and chauvinism cool. --Sean Axmaker