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Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series

The book Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series was made into the movie Eight Men Out.

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Book details for Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series

Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series was written by Eliot Asinof. The book was published in 1986 by Holt Rinehart Winston. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Eight Men Out

The movie was released in 1988. Eight Men Out was produced by MGM (Video & DVD). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include John Cusack, Jace Alexander, Gordon Clapp, James Desmond, Richard Edson, Don Harvey, Bill Irwin, Perry Lang, Michael Lerner, Christopher Lloyd, John Mahoney, Michael Mantell, James Read (II), Michael Rooker, Charlie Sheen, David Strathairn, D.B. Sweeney, Studs Terkel and Kevin Tighe.

 

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Eliot Asinof's detailed book Eight Men Out illustrates how the system of American sports collapsed in 1919, the year the Chicago White Sox threw the World Series. Filmmaker John Sayles worked on his script years before the 1988 film (or before he had the ... Read More
Eliot Asinof's detailed book Eight Men Out illustrates how the system of American sports collapsed in 1919, the year the Chicago White Sox threw the World Series. Filmmaker John Sayles worked on his script years before the 1988 film (or before he had the rights to make the film) as a labor of love. Sayles's adaptation proves one can make a historically accurate film in the day and age of artistic license. And what a story. Although many know about the "Black Sox," made famous--again--in the 1989 hit film Field of Dreams, the details of the saga are far less known. The center of Dreams, Shoeless Joe Jackson (portrayed correctly by D.B. Sweeney as illiterate and left-handed in Eight), is not the core of this film; it's ace pitcher Eddie Cicotte (Sayles favorite David Strathairn), who took the money, and third baseman Buck Weaver (John Cusack), who did not. The film fits nicely into Sayles's (Lone Star) strong suit: the ensemble drama. We are introduced to bickering owners, famous crooks, high-minded judges, lowlife gangsters, investigative reporters (played by Studs Terkel and Sayles himself), and, most of all, players who are at the breaking point when it comes to low salaries and degrading rewards. While some may feel the film is not as visceral as it should be, there is a great amount of verisimilitude when watching finely tuned athletes telling their bodies to play poorly--heartbreak on the nation's diamond. Beautifully detailed (like Sayles's previous labor-drama, Matewan), Eight Men Out gives us powerful lessons in which everyone lost: players, gamblers, and especially the fans who love the game. --Doug Thomas