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Eat a Bowl of Tea

The book Eat a Bowl of Tea was made into the movie Eat a Bowl of Tea.

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Book details for Eat a Bowl of Tea

Eat a Bowl of Tea was written by Louis Chu. The book was published in 1979 by Citadel Press. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Eat a Bowl of Tea

The movie was released in 1989 and directed by Wayne Wang, who also directed Anywhere But Here (1999) and Because of Winn-Dixie (2005). Eat a Bowl of Tea was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Cora Miao, Russell Wong, Victor Wong (III), Siu-Ming Lau, Eric Tsang, Lee Sau Kee, Yuen Fat Fai, Hui Fun, Lan Law, Ng Yuen Yee, Wu Ming Yu, Lui Tat, Wai Wong, Philip Chan, Tang Shun Nin, Michael Lee, Z. Greenstreet Kam, Woo Wang Tat, Stephen Fong and Paul Carr.

 

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Director Wayne Wang is in his appealingly low-key groove with this wry comedy-drama, a precursor to his later success with The Joy Luck Club. It's set in the aftermath of World War II, when the restrictive U.S. immigration laws had finally been relaxed. W... Read More
Director Wayne Wang is in his appealingly low-key groove with this wry comedy-drama, a precursor to his later success with The Joy Luck Club. It's set in the aftermath of World War II, when the restrictive U.S. immigration laws had finally been relaxed. WWII vet Russell Wong is a young Chinese-American hepcat, strong-armed by his dad (the wonderfully gnarled character actor Victor Wong) into an arranged marriage with a Chinese girl (Cora Miao). The trip to China, and the atmosphere of New York's Chinatown, are neatly mounted. The film's central joke, and metaphor, is the bridegroom's impotence after marriage; he's cowed by the expectations of his traditional culture, which don't necessarily match his own ideas. In its quiet way, Eat a Bowl of Tea examines the larger issues of ethnic identity while poking affectionate fun at its floundering characters--a distinctly modern attitude for a 1940s story. --Robert Horton