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Count a Lonely Cadence

The book Count a Lonely Cadence was made into the movie Cadence.

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Book details for Count a Lonely Cadence

Count a Lonely Cadence was written by Gordon Weaver. The book was published in 1968 by H. Regnery Co. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Cadence

The movie was released in 1990. Cadence was produced by Republic Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Charlie Sheen, Michael Beach, Jay Brazeau, Alec Burden, Roark Critchlow, Don S. Davis, Ken Douglas, Ramon Estevez, Laurence Fishburne, Steven Hilton, Samantha Langevin, Joe Lowry, Allan Lysell, Blu Mankuma, James Marshall, Weston McMillan, David Michael O'Neill, Harry Stewart and John Toles-Bey.

 

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Martin Sheen's 1991 directorial debut features Sheen as the disturbed head of a military stockade where the prisoners include a troublemaking Army misfit played by his son Charlie. Private Bean (Charlie Sheen) is thrown into the stockade with a group of f... Read More
Martin Sheen's 1991 directorial debut features Sheen as the disturbed head of a military stockade where the prisoners include a troublemaking Army misfit played by his son Charlie. Private Bean (Charlie Sheen) is thrown into the stockade with a group of five blacks calling themselves the Soul Patrol, and gradually learns teamwork from the men, including their leader Stokes (Laurence Fishburne). Eventually the tug of war between Bean and the bigoted commander reaches a boiling point with tragic conclusions, and Bean learns the meaning of compassion and the difference between right and wrong. The film is nothing particularly inspiring or insightful, but the supporting players, including Fishburne, give solid performances, and Cadence affords the audience a chance to see the father and son team work together in an earnest and well-meaning drama. --Robert Lane