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We Only Kill Each Other: The Life and Bad Times of Bugsy Siegel

The book We Only Kill Each Other: The Life and Bad Times of Bugsy Siegel was made into the movie Bugsy.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there is 1 vote for the book, and 3 votes for the movie.

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Book details for We Only Kill Each Other: The Life and Bad Times of Bugsy Siegel

We Only Kill Each Other: The Life and Bad Times of Bugsy Siegel was written by Dean Southern Jennings. The book was published in 1967 by Prentice-Hall. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Bugsy

The movie was released in 1991 and directed by Barry Levinson, who also directed The Natural (1984), Disclosure (1994), Sleepers (1996), Wag the Dog (1997) and Sphere (1998). Bugsy was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Warren Beatty, Annette Bening, Harvey Keitel, Ben Kingsley, Elliott Gould, Joe Mantegna, Richard C. Sarafian, Bebe Neuwirth, Gian-Carlo Scandiuzzi, Wendy Phillips, Stefanie Mason, Kimberly McCullough, Andy Romano, Robert Beltran, Bill Graham, Lewis Van Bergen, Joseph Roman, James Toback, Don Carrara and Carmine Caridi.

 

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Bugsy represents an almost miraculous combination of director, writer, and star on a project that represents a career highlight for everyone involved. It's one of the best American gangster movies ever made--as good in its own way as any of the Godfather ... Read More
Bugsy represents an almost miraculous combination of director, writer, and star on a project that represents a career highlight for everyone involved. It's one of the best American gangster movies ever made--as good in its own way as any of the Godfather films--and it's impossible to imagine anyone better than Beatty in the movie's flashy title role. As notorious mobster and Las Vegas visionary "Bugsy" Siegel, Beatty is perfectly cast as a man whose dreams are greater than his ability to realize them--or at least, greater than his ability to stay alive while making those dreams come true. With a glamorous Hollywood mistress (Annette Bening) who shares Bugsy's dream while pursuing her own upwardly mobile agenda, Bugsy seems oblivious to threats when he begins to spend too much of the mob's money on the creation of the Flamingo casino. Meyer Lansky (Ben Kingsley) and Mickey Cohen (Harvey Keitel) will support Bugsy's wild ambition to a point, after which all bets are off, and Bugsy's life hangs in the balance. From the obvious chemistry of Beatty and Bening (who met and later married off-screen) to the sumptuous reproduction of 1940s Hollywood, every detail in this movie feels impeccably right. Beatty is simply mesmerizing as the man who invented Las Vegas but never saw it thrive, moving from infectious idealism to brutal violence in the blink of an eye. Director Barry Levinson is also in peak form here, guiding the stylish story with a subtle balance of admiration and horror; we can catch Bugsy's Vegas fever and root for the gangster's success, but we know he'll get what he deserves. We might wish that Bugsy had lived to see his dream turn into a booming oasis, but the movie doesn't suggest that we should shed any tears. --Jeff Shannon