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Damage

The book Damage was made into the movie Fatale.

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Book details for Damage

Damage was written by Josephine Hart. The book was published in 1991 by Ballantine Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

Read More About This Book

"Hypnotic."THE BOSTON GLOBEHe was a married M.P.with two grown children. On the surface, his life was what he wanted it to be. She was his son's fiancee, a shattered woman who had only known forbidden love. When they meet, their attraction is instantaneou... Read More
"Hypnotic."

THE BOSTON GLOBE

He was a married M.P.with two grown children. On the surface, his life was what he wanted it to be. She was his son's fiancee, a shattered woman who had only known forbidden love. When they meet, their attraction is instantaneous, their obsession complete. And nothing, it seems, can tear them away from each other and their dangerous, damaging, illicit passion....

"Striking."

THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW


From the Paperback edition.

Movie details for Fatale

The movie was released in 1992 and directed by Brian De Palma, who also directed Scarface (1983), The Untouchables (1987), Casualties of War (1989), The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990), Carlito's Way (1993) and The Black Dahlia (2006). Fatale was produced by Warner Home Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Rebecca Romijn, Antonio Banderas, Peter Coyote, Eriq Ebouaney, Edouard Montoute, Rie Rasmussen, Thierry Frémont, Gregg Henry, Fiona Curzon, Daniel Milgram, Jean-Marc Minéo, Jean Chatel, Stéphane Petit, Olivier Follet, Eva Darlan, Jean-Marie Frin, Philippe Guégan, Denis Hecker, Laurence Breheret and Salvatore Ingoglia.

 

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The sheer pleasure of watching movies is celebrated in Brian De Palma's dazzling Femme Fatale. Working from his own intricate screenplay, De Palma indulges all of his trademark obsessions, upping the ante on Hitchcock (again) with a Vertigo-like plot that... Read More
The sheer pleasure of watching movies is celebrated in Brian De Palma's dazzling Femme Fatale. Working from his own intricate screenplay, De Palma indulges all of his trademark obsessions, upping the ante on Hitchcock (again) with a Vertigo-like plot that begins with an audacious heist at the Cannes film festival (another sexy, violent tour de force for De Palma). From there, the stunning thief Laure (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) assumes a new identity, marries a U.S. senator (Peter Coyote), and returns to Paris where a tenacious paparazzo (Antonio Banderas) becomes a patsy in her multilayered scheme. De Palma's weaving a web of nonsense, but his plotting is so exuberantly absurd--and his frame so full of visual clues and relevant detail--that Femme Fatale becomes a joyous thrill ride at first encounter, and a crazily logical (and grandly rewarding) movie on subsequent viewings. In her best role to date, Romijn-Stamos is everything you'd want a femme fatale to be, in a thriller that constantly challenges you to question what you're seeing. --Jeff Shannon