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The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love

The book The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love was made into the movie The Mambo Kings.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 5 votes for the book, and 3 votes for the movie.

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Book details for The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love

The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love was written by Oscar Hijuelos. The book was published in 1989 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for The Mambo Kings

The movie was released in 1992 and directed by Arne Glimcher, who also directed Just Cause (1995). The Mambo Kings was produced by Warner Home Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Armand Assante, Antonio Banderas, Cathy Moriarty, Maruschka Detmers, Pablo Calogero, Scott Cohen, Desi Arnaz Jr., Mario Grillo, Ralph Irizarry, Pete Macnamara, James Medina, Marcos Quintanilla, Tito Puente, J.T. Taylor, William Thomas Jr., Yul Vazquez, Celia Cruz, Roscoe Lee Browne, Vondie Curtis-Hall and Talisa Soto.

 

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This period drama is hot, hot, hot. Stylish and sexy, it is adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, by Oscar Hijuelos, the story of two brothers who flee from Cuba in the early 1950s, heading for New York. Hoping... Read More
This period drama is hot, hot, hot. Stylish and sexy, it is adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, by Oscar Hijuelos, the story of two brothers who flee from Cuba in the early 1950s, heading for New York. Hoping to make a name for themselves as famous musicians, the duo face hardships and painful discoveries along the way. Armand Assante is the older of the two, with a smoldering Antonio Banderas as his younger, more impetuous brother. (In his first English-speaking role, Banderas delivered all of his lines phonetically.) The pulsating, sweaty energy of the first half of the film is not sustained throughout. Partly this is because a movie about the rise and fall of minor celebrities has been done to death. Even when the action slows down, however, the story does not bore. There is too much sensuality and vitality exuded by both Assante and Banderas. --Rochelle O'Gorman