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Stonewall

The book Stonewall was made into the movie Stonewall.

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Book details for Stonewall

Stonewall was written by Martin Duberman. The book was published in 1993 by Plume. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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Movie details for Stonewall

The movie was released in 1995 and directed by Nigel Finch. Stonewall was produced by Fox Lorber. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Guillermo Díaz, Fred Weller, Brendan Corbalis, Duane Boutte, Bruce MacVittie, Peter Ratray, Dwight Ewell, Matthew Faber, Michael McElroy (II), Luis Guzmán, Joey Dedio, Tim Artz, Isaiah Washington, Candis Cayne, David Drumgold, Keith Levy, Fenton Lawless, Margaret Gibson (III), Vince Capone and George Rafferty.

 

Read More About This Movie

The fictional story line of Stonewall is framed by a piece of re-created gay history that has been chronicled before, primarily in such documentaries as Before Stonewall and After Stonewall. But here director Nigel Finch constructs a multilayered entert... Read More
The fictional story line of Stonewall is framed by a piece of re-created gay history that has been chronicled before, primarily in such documentaries as Before Stonewall and After Stonewall. But here director Nigel Finch constructs a multilayered entertainment set in and around the Stonewall riots of June 1969 (in New York) that marked the start of gay rights and activism. Stonewall is engaging and sympathetic to the plight of gays everywhere, who survived a world where homosexuality was a fate worse than death (and often resulted in it). This is a movie about survival, oppression, and the self-loathing that is inflicted by a world that refuses to understand anything different from mainstream morality. Within that dynamic is a familiar subplot about a young rube, Matty (Fred Weller), who comes from the Midwest to the big city in order to find himself and falls for a drag queen named La Miranda (Guillermo Díaz) in the process. Finch, who died prior to the film's completion (it was finished by producer Christine Vachon), uncovers something joyous in the angst of his characters and in the factual context of material that might have seemed overworked in less committed hands. --Paula Nechak