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Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang

The book Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang was made into the movie Foxfire.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 4 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang

Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang was written by Joyce Carol Oates. The book was published in 1993 by Plume. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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Movie details for Foxfire

The movie was released in 1996 and directed by Annette Haywood-Carter. Foxfire was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Hedy Burress, Angelina Jolie, Jenny Lewis, Jenny Shimizu, Sarah Rosenberg, Peter Facinelli, Dash Mihok, Michelle Brookhurst, Elden Henson, Cathy Moriarty, Richard Beymer, Fran Bennett, John Diehl, Chris Mulkey, Jay Acovone, Arwen Carter, Ever Carradine, Marķa Celedonio, Raissa Fleming and T.J. Galash.

 

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Angelina Jolie's strong-willed performance in Foxfire as Legs, the charismatic outsider based on the rebellious character from Joyce Carol Oates's novel, is a very good reason to see this 1996 drama. The film updates the story from the 1950s to the '90s... Read More
Angelina Jolie's strong-willed performance in Foxfire as Legs, the charismatic outsider based on the rebellious character from Joyce Carol Oates's novel, is a very good reason to see this 1996 drama. The film updates the story from the 1950s to the '90s, but for a while the air of teenage angst and confrontation is closer to the legacy of James Dean than gun-toting/body-piercing disaffection. Bold and larger-than-life, Legs quickly gathers a group of adolescent girls around her, each of whom has been sexually abused and is dealing in her own way with the emotional consequences. As expected, the girls plot out their revenge, but even more interesting is the intensity of their bond and rituals, the way they hang out in an abandoned house, their expressions of devotion. So tight and self-protective does this clique become that onlookers--fellow students, parents--become resentful. The final act loses faith somewhat with the mystique of this story, as a few hoary ideas (kidnapping, firearms) breach the film's originality. But what's good is good indeed, and Jolie's performance remains a harbinger of great things to come. --Tom Keogh