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Moll Flanders

The book Moll Flanders was made into the movie Moll Flanders.

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Book details for Moll Flanders

Moll Flanders was written by Daniel Defoe. The book was published in 1959 by Houghton Mifflin Company. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Daniel Defoe also wrote Robinson Crusoe (2001) and Robinson Crusoe (2001).

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Movie details for Moll Flanders

The movie was released in 1996 and directed by Pen Densham. Moll Flanders was produced by MGM (Video & DVD). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Robin Wright Penn, Morgan Freeman, Stockard Channing, John Lynch, Brenda Fricker, Geraldine James, Aisling Corcoran, Jim Sheridan (II), Jeremy Brett, Britta Smith, Cathy Murphy, Emma McIvor, Maria Doyle Kennedy, Ger Ryan, Harry Towb, Alan Stanford, Eileen McCloskey, Nicola Teehan, Chris Curran and Rynagh O'Grady.

 

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Robin Wright gives an adolescent, one-note performance as Daniel Defoe's 18th-century heroine, who has successive experiences as an abandoned child, a prostitute, a wife (five times over!), a thief, an artist's model, a felon, and much else. Writer-direct... Read More
Robin Wright gives an adolescent, one-note performance as Daniel Defoe's 18th-century heroine, who has successive experiences as an abandoned child, a prostitute, a wife (five times over!), a thief, an artist's model, a felon, and much else. Writer-director Pen Densham takes a Forrest Gump-like sentimental angle on Moll's many manifestations (quite a bit different from Terence Young's bawdy 1965 film version) and mostly succeeds in making a movie that is too silly, precious, and weepy. Morgan Freeman plays a narrator (who doesn't exist in the book), and there are some good performances from John Lynch, Stockard Channing, and Jeremy Brett. But by the time this wobbly adaptation reaches its sappy conclusion, one can't help but feel the overriding power of the film is to insult the intelligence with treacle. --Tom Keogh