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The Bishop's Wife

The book The Bishop's Wife was made into the movie The Preacher's Wife.

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Book details for The Bishop's Wife

The Bishop's Wife was written by Robert Nathan. The book was published in 1928 by The Bobbs-Merrill Co. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for The Preacher's Wife

The movie was released in 1996 and directed by Penny Marshall, who also directed Awakenings (1990). The Preacher's Wife was produced by Buena Vista Home Entertainment. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Denzel Washington, Whitney Houston, Courtney B. Vance, Gregory Hines, Jenifer Lewis, Loretta Devine, Justin Pierre Edmund, Lionel Richie, Paul Bates, Lex Monson, Darvel Davis Jr., William James Stiggers Jr., Marcella Lowery, Cissy Houston, Aaron A. McConnaughey, Shyheim Franklin, Taral Hicks, Kennan Scott, Jernard Burks and Michael Alexander Jackson.

 

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This tedious remake of the classic Christmas movie The Bishop's Wife falls on its face by significantly altering the careful design of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert E. Sherwood's story for the original film. In Sherwood's version, a rather wooden, ... Read More
This tedious remake of the classic Christmas movie The Bishop's Wife falls on its face by significantly altering the careful design of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert E. Sherwood's story for the original film. In Sherwood's version, a rather wooden, inept bishop and his lonely wife unknowingly take into their lives a heaven-sent angel who aids the former and ends up falling in love with the latter. In this unnecessary update, an inner-city preacher (Courtney B. Vance) and his estranged spouse (Whitney Houston) are visited by a celestial goof (Denzel Washington), whose unsolicited offer of help is enough to galvanize Vance's character to fix his own problems. What that means is this: by the second act, there's no reason to have Washington's angel in the story. Even his infatuation with the missus isn't enough to warrant his hanging around this movie; the change is a colossal blunder by director Penny Marshall. Vance ends up stealing the film from Washington, but it's a Pyrrhic victory; for the most part this movie just seems like a series of random scenes between opportunities for Houston to belt out songs. --Tom Keogh