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The Borrowers

The book The Borrowers was made into the movie The Borrowers.

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Book details for The Borrowers

The Borrowers was written by Mary Norton. The book was published in 1953 by Thorndike Press. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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Movie details for The Borrowers

The movie was released in 1997 and directed by Peter Hewitt. The Borrowers was produced by Polygram Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include John Goodman, Mark Williams, Jim Broadbent, Celia Imrie, Flora Newbigin, Tom Felton, Raymond Pickard, Bradley Pierce, Aden Gillett, Doon Mackichan, Hugh Laurie, Ruby Wax, Andrew Dunford, Bob Goody, Patrick Monckton, Dick Ward, George Yiasoumi, Alex Winter, Michael Hewitt and Simon Hewitt.

 

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The popular children's books by Mary Norton have been filmed before, but never with as much imagination and ingenuity as you'll find on display in this delightful fantasy film released to critical praise in 1998. The "Borrowers" of the title are a family ... Read More
The popular children's books by Mary Norton have been filmed before, but never with as much imagination and ingenuity as you'll find on display in this delightful fantasy film released to critical praise in 1998. The "Borrowers" of the title are a family of tiny people who live in the walls and under the floorboards in the homes of "normal-sized" humans; they earn their by "borrowing" the household items (string, food crumbs, buttons, etc.) needed to furnish their tiny hiding places and provide their meals. The little Clock family lives happily undisturbed in the home of an aged aunt, but when the aunt dies and her will is stolen by an unscrupulous lawyer (John Goodman), the Clocks face eviction and the frightening hazards of the outside world. Under the ingenious direction of Peter Hewitt, this simple, straightforward movie mixes comedy, adventure, and suspense with some of the cleverest special effects you've ever seen, taking full advantage of effects technologies to immerse you in the world of the tiny people. A climactic chase scene in a milk-bottling plant is a visual tour de force, and the movie's smart and dazzling enough to entertain parents and children alike. After its modest success in theaters, The Borrowers stands a good chance of becoming a home-video favorite. --Jeff Shannon