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Kiss the Girls

The book Kiss the Girls was made into the movie Kiss the Girls.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 9 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Kiss the Girls

Kiss the Girls was written by James Patterson. The book was published in 1995 by Warner Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

James Patterson also wrote Along Came Spider (1993).

 

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In Los Angeles, a reporter investigating a series of murders is killed. In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, a beautiful medical intern suddenly disappears. Washington D.C.s Alex Cross is back to solve the most baffling and terrifying murder case ever. Two cle... Read More
In Los Angeles, a reporter investigating a series of murders is killed. In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, a beautiful medical intern suddenly disappears. Washington D.C.s Alex Cross is back to solve the most baffling and terrifying murder case ever. Two clever pattern killers are collaborating, cooperating, competingand they are working coast to coast.

Movie details for Kiss the Girls

The movie was released in 1997 and directed by Gary Fleder, who also directed Impostor (2002) and Runaway Jury (2003). Kiss the Girls was produced by Paramount. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd, Cary Elwes, Alex McArthur, Tony Goldwyn, Jay O. Sanders, Bill Nunn, Brian Cox, Richard T. Jones, Roma Maffia, Jeremy Piven, Gina Ravera, William Converse-Roberts, Helen Martin (II), Tatyana Ali, Mena Suvari, Heidi Schanz, Rick Warner, Billy Blanks and Dianna Miranda.

 

Read More About This Movie

Coming after The Silence of the Lambs and Seven, this thriller about a collaboration between two serial killers feels like a pale attempt to cash in on the success of those earlier, better films. That's a pity, because this film certainly has its strength... Read More
Coming after The Silence of the Lambs and Seven, this thriller about a collaboration between two serial killers feels like a pale attempt to cash in on the success of those earlier, better films. That's a pity, because this film certainly has its strengths--particularly in the central performances of Morgan Freeman as a forensic detective and Ashley Judd as a would-be victim who escaped from one of the killers. Director Gary Fleder demonstrates visual flair and maintains an involving undercurrent of tension, but as this adaptation of James Patterson's novel approaches its climax, familiar elements combine to form a chronic case of thriller déjà vu. It's altogether competent filmmaking in the service of a moribund story of competing psychopaths, and by the time the serial killers reach the home stretch of their twisted contest, the movie's dangerously close to Freddy Kruger territory, with a finale that could've been borrowed from any dozen similar thrillers. --Jeff Shannon