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Just Another Sucker

The book Just Another Sucker was made into the movie Palmetto.

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Book details for Just Another Sucker

Just Another Sucker was written by James Hadley Chase. The book was published in 1960 by Magna Large Print Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

James Hadley Chase also wrote Miss Shumway Waves a Wand (1944), My Laugh Comes Last (1977) and Try This One for Size (1980).

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Movie details for Palmetto

The movie was released in 1998 and directed by Volker Schlöndorff, who also directed The Handmaid's Tale (1990). Palmetto was produced by Turner Home Ent. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Woody Harrelson, Elisabeth Shue, Gina Gershon, Rolf Hoppe, Michael Rapaport, Chloë Sevigny, Tom Wright, Marc Macaulay, Joe Hickey (II), Ralph Wilcox, Peter Paul DeLeo, Hal Jones (II), Salvador Levy, Richard Booker, Mikki Scanlon, Bill Larson, T.W. Terry, Jim Janey, Brett Rice and Vince Cecere.

 

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With a foreigner's revitalizing influence, German director Volker Schlondorff turns this standard potboiler (based on the novel Just Another Sucker by British pulp writer James Hadley Chase) into a beguiling exercise in genre classicism. Woody Harrelson s... Read More
With a foreigner's revitalizing influence, German director Volker Schlondorff turns this standard potboiler (based on the novel Just Another Sucker by British pulp writer James Hadley Chase) into a beguiling exercise in genre classicism. Woody Harrelson stars as a former journalist, just released from serving two years on a trumped-up charge, who is drawn into a troublesome mock-extortion scheme by the scheming wife (Elisabeth Shue) of a dying Florida millionaire. The movie's got style to spare and plenty of humid Florida atmosphere, but it's built on a series of improbable developments and is too low-key to generate riveting momentum. But Schlondorff occupies this tawdry territory with a keen sense of necessary mood and pace, maintaining adequate internal logic and awareness of the story's vintage roots. Subplots involving Shue's stepdaughter (Chloë Sevigny) and Harrelson's girlfriend (Gina Gershon) provide enjoyable distractions from the story's implausibilities. The movie's better suited to the fertile pulp mills of cable TV. But with an absurdly twisting plot to hold your interest, it's fun to watch how Schlondorff builds a bridge between traditional film noir and a more contemporary approach to sultry intrigue. --Jeff Shannon