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A Slipping-Down Life

The book A Slipping-Down Life was made into the movie A Slipping-Down Life.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 5 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for A Slipping-Down Life

A Slipping-Down Life was written by Anne Tyler. The book was published in 1970 by Ballantine Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Anne Tyler also wrote Accidental Tourist (1985).

 

Read More About This Book

"Without Anne Tyler, American fiction would be an immeasurably bleaker place."NEWSDAYEvie Decker is a shy, slightly plump teenager, lonely and silent. But her quiet life is shattered when she hears the voice of Drumstrings Casey on the radio and becomes i... Read More
"Without Anne Tyler, American fiction would be an immeasurably bleaker place."
NEWSDAY
Evie Decker is a shy, slightly plump teenager, lonely and silent. But her quiet life is shattered when she hears the voice of Drumstrings Casey on the radio and becomes instantly attracted to him. She manages to meet him, bursting out of her lonely shell--and into the attentive gaze of the intangible man who becomes all too real....


From the Paperback edition.

Movie details for A Slipping-Down Life

The movie was released in 1999. A Slipping-Down Life was produced by Lions Gate. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Guy Pearce and Sara Rue.

 

Read More About This Movie

Guy Pearce (Memento) and Lili Taylor (Six Feet Under) prove inspired casting for this otherwise mixed adaptation of Anne Tyler's novel. Taylor is Evie, a shy young woman stuck in a dead-end job (she wears a rabbit costume at a kiddie park) and living with... Read More
Guy Pearce (Memento) and Lili Taylor (Six Feet Under) prove inspired casting for this otherwise mixed adaptation of Anne Tyler's novel. Taylor is Evie, a shy young woman stuck in a dead-end job (she wears a rabbit costume at a kiddie park) and living with her withdrawn father (Tom Bower). Something leaps to life in Evie when she hears the music of local wannabe rock star "Drum" Casey (Pearce), and she begins to live for his success--not as a groupie, but as a deeply stirred convert who even carves his name in her forehead. The two join over a mutual sense of mission and even marry, but as soon as the wildness in Evie's heart is tempered, Drum's self-doubt goes through the roof. Actress Toni Kalem (Sister Act) makes her directorial debut and, while she does an exceptional job shaping performances, the film is distractingly busy and weak in structure. --Tom Keogh