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Waking the Dead

The book Waking the Dead was made into the movie Waking the Dead.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 5 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Waking the Dead

Waking the Dead was written by Scott Spencer. The book was published in 1986 by Recorded Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Scott Spencer also wrote Endless Love (1979).

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Movie details for Waking the Dead

The movie was released in 2000 and directed by Keith Gordon, who also directed The Chocolate War (1988), A Midnight Clear (1992) and Mother Night (1996). Waking the Dead was produced by Polygram USA Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Billy Crudup, Jennifer Connelly, Molly Parker, Janet McTeer, Paul Hipp, Sandra Oh, Hal Holbrook, Nelson Landrieu, Ivonne Coll, Lawrence Dane, Ed Harris, Larry Marshall, Stanley Anderson, Patricia Gage, John Carroll Lynch, Bruce Dinsmore, Mimi Kuzyk, Tony Calabretta, Walter Massey and Maxine Guess.

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Actor-turned-director Keith Gordon has crafted a touching love story that transcends time, political ideology, and even death. The movie opens in 1974 as Fielding Pierce (Billy Crudup) watches a TV news report announcing the death in Chile of three Americ... Read More
Actor-turned-director Keith Gordon has crafted a touching love story that transcends time, political ideology, and even death. The movie opens in 1974 as Fielding Pierce (Billy Crudup) watches a TV news report announcing the death in Chile of three American activists, including Sarah Williams (Jennifer Connelly), his one true love. The story flashes back to when they first met, showing how he was always more conservative, with grand political aspirations, but the relationship worked because they both shared dreams of making the world a better place, one from inside the system and the other from outside. The movie also flashes forward to his life in the early '80s, when he gets tapped to run for Congress. He starts having visions of her, but he is never quite sure if she's a hallucination arising out of his stress, a manifestation of his political consciousness, an out-and-out ghost, or maybe she's still alive somehow. Whatever she is, his deep longing for her is making him crack up. Gordon smartly jumps the story back and forth in time, forgoing an "objective" reality in favor of a more subjective and emotional one. It is a structure based on memory, and that in tandem with the content is what makes Waking the Dead a very powerful film indeed.--Andy Spletzer