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Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

The book Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America was made into the movie Prozac Nation.

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Book details for Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America

Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America was written by Elizabeth Wurtzel. The book was published in 1994 by Replica Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Elizabeth Wurtzel writes with her finger in the faint pulse of a generation whose ruling icons are Kurt Cobain, Xanax, and pierced tongues. A memoir of her bouts with depression and skirmishes with drugs, Prozac Nation still manages to be a witty and sh... Read More
Elizabeth Wurtzel writes with her finger in the faint pulse of a generation whose ruling icons are Kurt Cobain, Xanax, and pierced tongues. A memoir of her bouts with depression and skirmishes with drugs, Prozac Nation still manages to be a witty and sharp account of the psychopharmacology of an era.

Movie details for Prozac Nation

The movie was released in 2001 and directed by Erik Skjoldbjærg. Prozac Nation was produced by Miramax Home Entertainment. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Christina Ricci, Jason Biggs, Anne Heche, Michelle Williams, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Jessica Lange, Jesse Moss (II), Nicholas Campbell, Zoe Miller (II), Sheila Paterson, Rob Freeman, Nicole Parker (II), Frida Betrani, Klodyne Rodney, Ian Tracey, Wendy Noel, Bill Marchant, Tom Kent (II), Christine Anton and Cindy Lentol.

 

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Fans of Christina Ricci will note that the saucer-eyed actress takes a big leap from deadpan-child and grumpy-ingenue roles with Prozac Nation, an adaptation of Elizabeth Wurtzel's bestselling book. Ricci puts her all into playing Lizzie, a self-absorbed... Read More
Fans of Christina Ricci will note that the saucer-eyed actress takes a big leap from deadpan-child and grumpy-ingenue roles with Prozac Nation, an adaptation of Elizabeth Wurtzel's bestselling book. Ricci puts her all into playing Lizzie, a self-absorbed Ivy League writer wannabe who alienates friends and family with her out-of-control mood swings and other chemical imbalances. Ricci is committed and convincing, but nothing she does ameliorates Lizzie's exasperating personality; spending 90 minutes around this person is an eternity of tantrums. Around to provide audience stand-ins are Jason Biggs, Michelle Williams, and Jonathan Rhys-Meyers, all of whom disapprove of Lizzie's self-destructive behavior. Jessica Lange, professional as always, is Lizzie's brittle mother. If the movie really did capture the sense of the zeitgeist suggested by its grandiose title, or if it carried some intriguing stylistic urgency that carried us into its depressive labyrinth, perhaps Lizzie's journey would be palatable. But the long delay between Prozac Nation's shooting (in 2001) and its emergence on cable-TV and DVD is all too easy to understand. --Robert Horton