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Children on Their Birthdays (story)

The book Children on Their Birthdays (story) was made into the movie Children on Their Birthdays.

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Book details for Children on Their Birthdays (story)

Children on Their Birthdays (story) was written by Truman Capote. . More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Truman Capote also wrote The Grass Harp (1951).

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Movie details for Children on Their Birthdays

The movie was released in 2002 and directed by Mark Medoff. Children on Their Birthdays was produced by Lions Gate. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Sheryl Lee, Joe Pichler, Jesse Plemons, Tania Raymonde, Christopher McDonald, Tom Arnold, Phyllis Frelich, Lucina Paquet, Freeman Coffey, Joe Van Slyke, Tom Brainard, Emily Clibourn, Cynthia Baker, Weston Mueller, Paul Quaintance, Ritch Brinkley, Brazhal Brewer, Alexander Piccolo, John Judd (III) and Marilyn Dodds Frank.

 

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Fans of film adaptations of Truman Capote's original fiction will delight in the familiar terrain of Southern nostalgia and wide-eyed yearning that defines Children on Their Birthdays. Based on a Capote story, this 2002 feature stars Joe Pichler as Billy ... Read More
Fans of film adaptations of Truman Capote's original fiction will delight in the familiar terrain of Southern nostalgia and wide-eyed yearning that defines Children on Their Birthdays. Based on a Capote story, this 2002 feature stars Joe Pichler as Billy Bob, a boy whose post-World War II horizons broaden considerably with the arrival of Lilly Jane (Tania Raymonde), a glistening idealist and would-be Hollywood starlet, in his Medda, Alabama, neighborhood. So exotic, erudite, and almost recklessly expansive is Lilly Jane that she lights a fire of progressive thought (or perhaps truer courtesy) in the habitually racist community, inspiring Billy Bob to outgrow his narrow boyhood. Typical of Capote, there is something of the Dying Swan about Lilly Jane, but her Mystery is genuine and affecting. Playwright Mark Medoff directs with conviction but little skill; the film is saved by pure heart and a solid cast, including Sheryl Lee and Christopher McDonald. --Tom Keogh