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Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason

The book Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason was made into the movie Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 3 votes for the book, and 3 votes for the movie.

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Book details for Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason

Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason was written by Helen Fielding. The book was published in 1999 by Picador. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Helen Fielding also wrote Bridget Jone's Diary (1998).

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Movie details for Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason

The movie was released in 2004 and directed by Beeban Kidron. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Renée Zellweger, Gemma Jones, Jim Broadbent, James Faulkner, Celia Imrie, Dominic McHale, Colin Firth, Donald Douglas (III), Shirley Dixon, Neil Pearson, Rosalind Halstead, Luis Soto (II), Tom Brooke (III), Hugh Grant, Alba Fleming Furlan, Jacinda Barrett, Sally Phillips, James Callis, Shirley Henderson and Lucy Robinson.

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Although it's been three years since we last saw Bridget (Renée Zellweger), only a few weeks have passed in her world. She is, as you'll remember, no longer a "singleton," having snagged stuffy but gallant Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) at the end of the 2001 f... Read More
Although it's been three years since we last saw Bridget (Renée Zellweger), only a few weeks have passed in her world. She is, as you'll remember, no longer a "singleton," having snagged stuffy but gallant Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) at the end of the 2001 film. Now she's fallen deeply in love and out of her neurotic mind with paranoia: Is Mark cheating on her with that slim, bright young thing from the law office? Will the reappearance of dashing cad Daniel Cleaver (Hugh Grant) further spell the end of her self-confidence when they're shoved off to Thailand together for a TV travel story? If such questions also seem pressing to you, this sequel will be fairly painless, but you shouldn't expect anything fresh. Director Beeban Kidron and her screenwriters--all four of them!--are content to sink matters into slapstick, with chunky Zellweger (who's unflatteringly photographed) the literal butt of all jokes. Though the star still has her charms, and some of Bridget's social gaffes are amusing, the film is mired in low comedy--a sequence in a Thai women's prison is more offensive than outrageous--with only Grant's rakish mischief to pull it out of the swamp. --Steve Wiecking