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The Night I Followed the Dog

The book The Night I Followed the Dog was made into the movie The Night I Followed the Dog.

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Book details for The Night I Followed the Dog

The Night I Followed the Dog was written by Nina Laden. The book was published in 1994 by Chronicle Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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"I have a dog. Nothing exotic or special, just an ordinary dog. In fact, I always thought he was a boring dog. What I mean is, he can fetch, roll over, and shake hands, but mostly he sleeps and eats." Or so the little boy in this story thinks, until one m... Read More
"I have a dog. Nothing exotic or special, just an ordinary dog. In fact, I always thought he was a boring dog. What I mean is, he can fetch, roll over, and shake hands, but mostly he sleeps and eats."
Or so the little boy in this story thinks, until one morning when he opens the door a little early and sees his dog jump out of a limousine. That night he decides to follow his dog, and that's when the fun starts.
Before he knows it, he has entered the little known world of doggy glamour. His dog, distinctly reminiscent of Humphrey Bogart, treats him to a nighttime adventure where he learns where dogs go to relax and sees what they do while their masters are fast asleep. A terrific read aloud, Nina Laden's story will have everyone captivated by the coolest dog around.

Awards and honors for The Night I Followed the Dog:
Bookbuilder's West Design Award
CBC-IRA Children's Choice Award
Parents' Choice Award
A Reading Rainbow Book

Movie details for The Night I Followed the Dog

The movie was released in 2004 and directed by Mark Cole (II), SueAnn Fincke and Jim Milio. The Night I Followed the Dog was produced by Universal Studios. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Cesar Millan.

 

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If you think your dog has behavioral problems, you'll feel better after watching 10 minutes of Dog Whisperer Cesar Millan's hard-luck cases. The smashing success of Millan's National Geographic Channel series is due partly to that feeling of relief--that ... Read More
If you think your dog has behavioral problems, you'll feel better after watching 10 minutes of Dog Whisperer Cesar Millan's hard-luck cases. The smashing success of Millan's National Geographic Channel series is due partly to that feeling of relief--that no matter how bad your own dog's behavior, by and large, it's not nearly as bad as Millan's clients'; it's kind of like Nanny 911, but with dogs. Millan is also a telegenic, confident animal handler, whose basic message is reinforced in virtually every case: Don't treat your dog like a human; treat him like a dog, and be the alpha dog of your own household/pack. This canine golden rule applies to all kinds of doggie nut jobs: crazy little Chihuahua NuNu, who bites everyone but his owner; big sweetie-pie Great Dane Kane, whose puppy mishap sliding on a slick floor has made him terrified to walk on tile or linoleum; Brooks, who spins in circles trying to re-create a game involving looking for a laser light; and Maya the pitbull mix, who's sweet-tempered enough to let a kitten "nurse" on her nightly, but who tears apart her household a dozen times a day. One of Millan's most amazing success stories in this 26-episode series involves Churchill, a Rottweiler-shepherd mix who's docile and loving at home, but literally tries to attack all other dogs and even bites a neighbor, thus ending up on the brink of doggie death row. But within 15 minutes, Millan's calm confidence, and gentle but firm application of tugs on a well-angled leash have Churchill passing and sitting near a strange dog placidly.

Extras include some outtakes, footage of Millan's beloved wife and kids, and a hilarious "audition" tape, in which owners with their unhinged dogs are telling an off-camera producer why their pet should be considered for the show. All the while, the dogs are pacing, whining, refusing to budge and otherwise providing a lot of unintended amusement. --A.T. Hurley