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The Notebook

The book The Notebook was made into the movie The Notebook.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 4 votes for the book, and 5 votes for the movie.

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Book details for The Notebook

The Notebook was written by Nicholas Sparks. The book was published in 1996 by Warner Books. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Nicholas Sparks also wrote Message in a Bottle (1998) and A Walk to Remember (1999).

 

Read More About This Book

"Somewhere," muses Noah Calhoun, while sitting on his porch in the moonight, "there were people making love." Anyway, head elsewhere for Great Literature, but if you're in the market to get your heartstrings plucked, look no further. The Notebook, a South... Read More
"Somewhere," muses Noah Calhoun, while sitting on his porch in the moonight, "there were people making love." Anyway, head elsewhere for Great Literature, but if you're in the market to get your heartstrings plucked, look no further. The Notebook, a Southern-fried story of love-lost-and-found-again, revolves around a single time-honored romantic dilemma: will beautiful Allison Nelson stay with Mr. Respectability (to whom she happens to be engaged), or will she hook up with Noah, the romantic rascal she left so many years ago? We're not telling, but you have two guesses and the first one doesn't count. Decades later, after Allison develops Alzheimer's, her beau uses "the notebook" to read her the story of the great love she's plumb forgot. The Notebook--film rights already sold, thank you very much--is a little glazed doughnut of a book: sticky- sweet, satisfying, not much nourishment. But who cares? Take an extra vitamin and indulge.

Movie details for The Notebook

The movie was released in 2004 and directed by Nick Cassavetes. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Tim Ivey, Gena Rowlands, Starletta DuPois, James Garner, Anthony-Michael Q. Thomas, Ed Grady, Renée Amber, Jennifer Echols, Geoffrey Knight, Kevin Connolly, Ryan Gosling, Heather Wahlquist, Rachel McAdams, Andrew Schaff, Matt Shelly, Michael D. Fuller, Jonathan Parks Jordan, Leslea Fisher, Jude Kitchens and Sam Shepard.

 

Read More About This Movie

When you consider that old-fashioned tearjerkers are an endangered species in Hollywood, a movie like The Notebook can be embraced without apology. Yes, it's syrupy sweet and clogged with clichés, and one can only marvel at the irony of Nick Cassavetes di... Read More
When you consider that old-fashioned tearjerkers are an endangered species in Hollywood, a movie like The Notebook can be embraced without apology. Yes, it's syrupy sweet and clogged with clichés, and one can only marvel at the irony of Nick Cassavetes directing a weeper that his late father John--whose own films were devoid of saccharine sentiment--would have sneered at. Still, this touchingly impassioned and great-looking adaptation of the popular Nicholas Sparks novel has much to recommend, including appealing young costars (Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams) and appealing old costars (James Garner and Gena Rowlands, the director's mother) playing the same loving couple in (respectively) early 1940s and present-day North Carolina. He was poor, she was rich, and you can guess the rest; decades later, he's unabashedly devoted, and she's drifting into the memory-loss of senile dementia. How their love endured is the story preserved in the titular notebook that he reads to her in their twilight years. The movie's open to ridicule, but as a delicate tearjerker it works just fine. Message in a Bottle and A Walk to Remember were also based on Sparks novels, suggesting a triple-feature that hopeless romantics will cherish. --Jeff Shannon