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Slaves of New York

The movie Slaves of New York was based on the book Slaves of New York.

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Movie details for Slaves of New York

The movie was released in 1989 and directed by James Ivory, who also directed Quartet (1981), Heat and Dust (1982), The Bostonians (1984), Room With a View (1986), Maurice (1987), Howard's End (1992), A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries (1998), The Golden Bowl (2000) and Divorce, Le (2003). Slaves of New York was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Bernadette Peters, Chris Sarandon, Mary Beth Hurt, Madeleine Potter, Adam Coleman Howard, Jsu Garcia, Charles McCaughan, John Harkins, Mercedes Ruehl, Joe Leeway, Anna Katarina, Bruce Peter Young, Michael Schoeffling, Steve Buscemi, Jonas Abry, Stephen Bastone, Denise Beaumont, Mark Boone Junior, Dianne Brill and Michael Butler (III).

 

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Book details for Slaves of New York

Slaves of New York was written by Tama Janowitz. The book was published in 1986 by Washington Square Press. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

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In Tama Janowitz's story collection of mid-1980s manners, it's all about real estate. Her coterie of New York artists and grad students, junkies and collectors dwells in walk-ups and covets lofts. The occasional socialite wafts through, characterized ters... Read More
In Tama Janowitz's story collection of mid-1980s manners, it's all about real estate. Her coterie of New York artists and grad students, junkies and collectors dwells in walk-ups and covets lofts. The occasional socialite wafts through, characterized tersely by statements of fact; for example, "Millie owned her own co-op." But, for the most part, these are the also-rans of Manhattan life, literally looking for a toehold in the city. The main character who emerges is shabby Eleanor, an appealing heroine who appears in several linked stories. A jewelry maker, she lives with an artist named Stash and a treasure-trove of insecurities. Much is made of the squalor of their apartment. In Eleanor, Janowitz finds a channel for her vulnerability--a nice counterpoint to her affectless prose, which attempts and occasionally achieves a deadpan humor.

Intertwined with the Eleanor stories are the unreliable first-person narratives of Marley Mantello. Marley, too, has serious real estate issues: "My apartment, the sublet from which I was being evicted, looked just as terrible as when I had gone out earlier--worse, even, for there was a foul reek of something fecund and feline, like the stench of old lion spoor upon the veldt."

The rest of the stories are brief thumbnails, which Janowitz calls "modern saints" and "case histories." Stabbing at experimentalism, they showcase her shortcomings--the lazy satire, the easy laugh. This author's prose seemed of-the-moment when it came out, and time has not been altogether kind. "I was startled to find him so far uptown, knowing how he usually refused to travel above Fourteenth Street, claiming it led to mental decay," says the narrator of "In and Out of the Cat Bag." This kind of observation may have seemed edgy in 1985, but has little staying power. At its best, Slaves effervesces a bittersweet nostalgia for a time when artists could still afford to live in Manhattan. --Claire Dederer