RESOURCES

Cousin Bette

The movie Cousin Bette was based on the book Cousin Bette.

Which one did you like better, the movie or the book?  Right now there are 3 votes for the book, and 2 votes for the movie.

VOTE NOW:         

Movie details for Cousin Bette

The movie was released in 1998 and directed by Des McAnuff. Cousin Bette was produced by 20th Century Fox. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Jessica Lange, Elisabeth Shue, Bob Hoskins, Hugh Laurie, Aden Young, Kelly Macdonald, Toby Stephens, Jefferson Mays, Geraldine Chaplin, John Benfield, Paul Bandey, Laura Fraser (II), Janie Hargreaves, Gillian Martell, John Sessions, Henrik Wager, John Quentin, Tim Barlow, Heathcote Williams and Philip Jackson (II).

 

Read More About This Movie

With little persuasion, Jenny is soon sleeping with, then discarding, every man in Paris, setting off a chain of disastrous events that ensnares almost everyone in its web - everyone, that is, except Cousin Bette. Who knew adultery, financial ruin, life -... Read More
With little persuasion, Jenny is soon sleeping with, then discarding, every man in Paris, setting off a chain of disastrous events that ensnares almost everyone in its web - everyone, that is, except Cousin Bette. Who knew adultery, financial ruin, life - threatening duels and murder could be such fun?

Book details for Cousin Bette

Cousin Bette was written by Honoré de Balzac. The book was published in 2002 by Modern Library. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

 

Read More About This Book

“Bette is a wronged soul; and when her passion does break, it is, as Balzac says, sublime and terrifying,” wrote V. S. Pritchett. A late masterpiece in Balzac’s La Comédie Humaine, Cousin Bette is the story of a Vosges peasant who rebels... Read More
“Bette is a wronged soul; and when her passion does break, it is, as Balzac says, sublime and terrifying,” wrote V. S. Pritchett. A late masterpiece in Balzac’s La Comédie Humaine, Cousin Bette is the story of a Vosges peasant who rebels against her scornful upper-class relatives, skillfully turning their selfish obsessions against them. The novel exemplifies what Henry James described as Balzac’s “huge, all-compassing, all-desiring, all-devouring love of reality.”