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Women in Film

The movie Women in Film was based on the book I'm Losing You.

Which one did you like better, the movie or the book?  Right now there are 3 votes for the book, and 3 votes for the movie.

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Movie details for Women in Film

The movie was released in 2001. Women in Film was produced by Sundance Channel Home Entertainment. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Brian O'Halloran.

 

Read More About This Movie

This limited edition, special collectors' DVD set celebrates 25 years of the Sundance Institute. It contains ten ground-breaking films that embody the sprit of independence, creative risk-taking, and diversity that define the Sundance Film Festival. Bonu... Read More
This limited edition, special collectors' DVD set celebrates 25 years of the Sundance Institute. It contains ten ground-breaking films that embody the sprit of independence, creative risk-taking, and diversity that define the Sundance Film Festival. Bonus materials include a booklet and an 11th disc with behind-the-scenes footage from the Sundance Institute Labs and never-before-seen interviews with filmmakers and founder Robert Redford.

Book details for I'm Losing You

I'm Losing You was written by Bruce Wagner. The book was published in 1996 by Plume. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Bruce Wagner also wrote I'm Losing You (1996).

 

Read More About This Book

Screenwriter Bruce Wagner, writer for the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series and of the TV mini-series "White Palms," has set his second novel, like his first, Force Majeure, in the hip world with which he is intimate--Hollywood, as in Babylon writ large, a... Read More
Screenwriter Bruce Wagner, writer for the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series and of the TV mini-series "White Palms," has set his second novel, like his first, Force Majeure, in the hip world with which he is intimate--Hollywood, as in Babylon writ large, a world of dreams shattered or grotesquely corrupted. Arranged in short sections, each written from the viewpoint of some 20 alternating characters, without a clear plot line, the book's style is as disorienting as the drug-dazed sexually abusive lifestyles of the players. Wagner pulls no punches in his descriptions of these pitiable losers and vile winners; indeed parts of the book are hard on the stomach. The book is unrelentingly powerful, and occasionally downright revolting.