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The Tenants

The movie The Tenants was based on the book The Tenants.

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Movie details for The Tenants

The movie was released in 2006 and directed by Danny Green and Danny Green (VI). The Tenants was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Dylan McDermott, Snoop Dogg, Rose Byrne, Seymour Cassel, Niki J. Crawford, Aldis Hodge, Linda Lawson (III), Stephen Jared, Laz Alonso, Christopher May, Karimah Westbrook and Lamont Bentley.

 

Read More About This Movie

Set in 1972 Brooklyn, Henry Lesser (Dylan McDermott) is the sole tenant in a rundown tenement struggling to finish a novel. His solitary pursuit of the sublime grows complicated when Willie Spearmint (Snoop Dogg), a black militant writer, moves into the ... Read More
Set in 1972 Brooklyn, Henry Lesser (Dylan McDermott) is the sole tenant in a rundown tenement struggling to finish a novel. His solitary pursuit of the sublime grows complicated when Willie Spearmint (Snoop Dogg), a black militant writer, moves into the building. Henry and Willie are artistic rivals and unwilling neighbors, and their uneasy peace is disturbed by the presence of Willie's white girlfriend and the landlord's attempt to evict both men and demolish the building.

Book details for The Tenants

The Tenants was written by Bernard Malamud. The book was published in 1971 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Bernard Malamud also wrote Natural (1952).

 

Read More About This Book

With a new introduction by Aleksandar HemonIn The Tenants (1971), Bernard Malamud brought his unerring sense of modern urban life to bear on the conflict between blacks and Jews then inflaming his native Brooklyn. The sole tenant in a rundown tenement, He... Read More
With a new introduction by Aleksandar Hemon

In The Tenants (1971), Bernard Malamud brought his unerring sense of modern urban life to bear on the conflict between blacks and Jews then inflaming his native Brooklyn. The sole tenant in a rundown tenement, Henry Lesser is struggling to finish a novel, but his solitary pursuit of the sublime grows complicated when Willie Spearmint, a black writer ambivalent toward Jews, moves into the building. Henry and Willie are artistic rivals and unwilling neighbors, and their uneasy peace is disturbed by the presence of Willie's white girlfriend Irene and the landlord Levenspiel's attempts to evict both men and demolish the building. This novel's conflict, current then, is perennial now; it reveals the slippery nature of the human condition, and the human capacity for violence and undoing.