RESOURCES

In the Heat of the Night

The book In the Heat of the Night was made into the movie The Mean Season.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 3 votes for the book, and 7 votes for the movie.

VOTE NOW:         

Book details for In the Heat of the Night

In the Heat of the Night was written by John Katzenback. The book was published in 1982.

John Katzenback also wrote Just Cause (1992) and Hart's War (1999).

Read More About This Book

Movie details for The Mean Season

The movie was released in 1985 and directed by Phillip Borsos. The Mean Season was produced by MGM (Video & DVD). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Kurt Russell, Mariel Hemingway, Richard Jordan, Richard Masur, Richard Bradford, Joe Pantoliano, Andy Garcia, Rose Portillo, William Smith, John Palmer (VII), Lee Sandman, Dan Fitzgerald (II), Cynthia Caquelin, Fred Ornstein, Fritz Bronner, Mike DeRienzo, Michael Clay (II), Fred Buch, Bruce McLaughlin and Robert Apte.

 

Read More About This Movie

Kurt Russell and Mariel Hemingway star in this well-above-average thriller. Mean Season offers plenty of suspense as well as an interesting take on the role of the press in sustaining the very violence it covers. Russell plays Malcolm Anderson, a burned-o... Read More
Kurt Russell and Mariel Hemingway star in this well-above-average thriller. Mean Season offers plenty of suspense as well as an interesting take on the role of the press in sustaining the very violence it covers. Russell plays Malcolm Anderson, a burned-out journalist who never got the big career-making story he always wanted. Just as he's about to give up and move to the idyllic countryside, the big story comes to him--in the form of a serial killer with a fixation for Anderson himself. As Anderson's fame grows, he starts getting hounded by his brethren, the press. Add this to the assorted problems that go along with having a serial killer a little too interested in one's personal life, and you've got major trouble. Director Phillip Borsos does a nice job of conveying information through quick visuals, and even sets up some moments of eerie beauty, such as the shot of a victim's apartment, covered in a snowfall of pillow feathers. More importantly, Borsos knows he's making a thriller and makes sure to have fun doing it: there are plenty of loooooong shadows and a few good jolts along the way. As Anderson's girlfriend, Mariel Hemingway is essentially asked to play bait, but manages to flesh out what could easily have been a cardboard character. --Ali Davis