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The Wizard of Loneliness

The book The Wizard of Loneliness was made into the movie The Wizard of Loneliness.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there are 7 votes for the book, and 7 votes for the movie.

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Book details for The Wizard of Loneliness

The Wizard of Loneliness was written by John Treadwell Nichols. The book was published in 1966.

John Treadwell Nichols also wrote The Milagro Beanfield War (1974).

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Movie details for The Wizard of Loneliness

The movie was released in 1988 and directed by Todd Holland. The Wizard of Loneliness was produced by Universal Studios. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Luke Edwards, Vince Trankina, Wendy Phillips, Dea McAllister, Sam McMurray, Beau Bridges, Fred Savage, Christian Slater, Will Seltzer, Roy Conrad, Jenny Lewis, Roderick Dexter, Ray Bickel, Chuck Skinner, W.K. Cowan, William C. Thompson (II), Sonny Dukes, T. Dan Hopkins, Jason Oliver and Rowdy Metzger.

 

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Less raunchy than Tommy and more conventional than Tron, The Wizard also revolves around gaming. There's even a Bridges on board. In Tron it was Jeff, in The Wizard it's Beau. As opposed to the rock opera's pinball-playing "deaf, dumb, and blind kid," how... Read More
Less raunchy than Tommy and more conventional than Tron, The Wizard also revolves around gaming. There's even a Bridges on board. In Tron it was Jeff, in The Wizard it's Beau. As opposed to the rock opera's pinball-playing "deaf, dumb, and blind kid," however, quasi-catatonic Jimmy (Luke Edwards) is a video game wiz. While the nine-year-old lives with his mother, half-brothers Corey (Fred Savage, circa The Wonder Years) and Nick (Christian Slater, fresh from Heathers) live with their father, Sam (Bridges). When Jimmy, who recently lost his sister, is placed in a home, Corey busts him out for a trip to California. (Today, Jimmy's condition would be labeled post-traumatic stress disorder.) As they're leaving Utah, they join forces with gaming enthusiast Haley (Rilo Kiley's Jenny Lewis), who suggests LA's National Video Game Championships. So, off they go by foot, skateboard, and the kindness of strangers. Sam, Nick, and obnoxious bounty hunter Putnam (Will Seltzer) are close behind. The outcome may be a foregone conclusion--the fractured family makes their peace--but The Wizard still offers a nostalgic, Nintendo-laden look at 1980s gamer culture (Power Glove, Super Mario Bros. 3, etc.). Plus, sharp-eyed viewers will spot Toby Maguire milling around before the showdown at Universal Studios Theme Park. If not for the hitchhiking, gambling, and reckless automotive destruction--after Putnam takes a knife to Sam's tires, Sam smashes his headlights with a shovel--the movie would be appropriate for all ages. In other words, it earns its PG rating. --Kathleen C. Fennessy