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Imaginary Crimes

The book Imaginary Crimes was made into the movie Imaginary Crimes.

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Book details for Imaginary Crimes

Imaginary Crimes was written by Sheila Ballantyne. The book was published in 1982 by Penguin. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Imaginary Crimes

The movie was released in 1994 and directed by Anthony Drazan. Imaginary Crimes was produced by Warner Home Video. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Harvey Keitel, Fairuza Balk, Kelly Lynch, Vincent D'Onofrio, Diane Baker, Chris Penn, Amber Benson, Elisabeth Moss, Richard Venture, Seymour Cassel, Tori Paul, Melissa Berntsen, Annette O'Toole, Bill Geisslinger, William G. Schilling, Luke Reilly, Peggy Gormley, Chad Burton, April Henderson and Rebecca Long.

 

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Children are so ill prepared to deal with the shortcomings of their parents that, when they inevitably discover that mom and dad have feet of clay, they tend to overreact. That's part of the lesson in this film, based on the semi-autobiographical novel by... Read More
Children are so ill prepared to deal with the shortcomings of their parents that, when they inevitably discover that mom and dad have feet of clay, they tend to overreact. That's part of the lesson in this film, based on the semi-autobiographical novel by Sheila Ballantyne. Harvey Keitel is a 1950s widower with two daughters, played by Fairuza Balk and Elisabeth Moss. A guy with lots of dreams, a convincing line of patter, and very little to back up either, he hustles to keep his family together, doing what he feels is the best he can to keep food on the table on clothes on their backs. But his loneliness, his drinking--and, ultimately, his inability to be a square dealer with the business associates he's cheating--contribute to his older daughter's disillusionment. Strong performances by Keitel, who is surprisingly touching, and Balk, who captures the mood-swing roller coaster of adolescence, complicated by being forced to grow up before her time. --Marshall Fine