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Impostor (story)

The book Impostor (story) was made into the movie Impostor.

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Book details for Impostor (story)

Impostor (story) was written by Philip K. Dick. .

Philip K. Dick also wrote Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968), The Scanner Darkly (1977), We Can Remember It For You Wholesale (story) (1990), Second Variety (story) (1991), Minority Report (story) (2002) and Paycheck (story) (2003).

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Movie details for Impostor

The movie was released in 2002 and directed by Gary Fleder, who also directed Kiss the Girls (1997) and Runaway Jury (2003). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Gary Sinise, Madeleine Stowe, Vincent D'Onofrio, Tony Shalhoub, Tim Guinee, Mekhi Phifer, Gary Dourdan, Lindsay Crouse, Elizabeth Peņa, Jason Beck (II), Judy Jean Berns, Veena Bidasha, Ellen Bradley, Shane Brolly, Golden Brooks, Brian Brophy, Burt Bulos, Scott Burkholder, Morty Coyle and Yvette Ocampo.

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Based on a short story by sci-fi master Philip K. Dick, Impostor holds considerable appeal for genre enthusiasts, who will instantly recognize trace elements of the Dick-based Total Recall and Blade Runner. Fortunately, derivative plotting doesn't detr... Read More
Based on a short story by sci-fi master Philip K. Dick, Impostor holds considerable appeal for genre enthusiasts, who will instantly recognize trace elements of the Dick-based Total Recall and Blade Runner. Fortunately, derivative plotting doesn't detract from director Gary Fleder's capable handling of briskly paced action involving Spencer Olham (Gary Sinise), a weapons designer suspected of being an alien robot with an assassin's agenda. The year is 2079; Earth is at war with an alien race called the Centauri, and its dome-sealed cities are intensely monitored by the Earth Security Agency. A high-tech chase ensues between Olham and his ESA pursuer (Vincent D'Onofrio), testing the bond of trust between Olham and his physician wife (Madeleine Stowe). This marital subplot gives the film's twist ending additional impact, and Dick's recurring themes of lost identity and drug-altered reality are handled with adequate sophistication, while cool gadgetry and sharp visual effects compensate for the plot holes. --Jeff Shannon